contents

world
 
American Library Association names Whale Music book a top ten

Thousand Mile Song: Whale Music in a Sea of Sound (Basic Books, 2008) by NJIT humanities professor, author and clarinetist David Rothenberg, has been named one of the ten best science and technology books for 2008 by Booklist on Line, a publication of the American Library Association.

To research the book and learn about whale music, Rothenberg traveled from Hawaii to Russia to play his bass clarinet while playing and recording interspecies duets with the melodic mammals. The corollary compact disc Whale Music featuring the sounds of beluga, killer and humpback whales can be heard at http://cdbaby.com/cd/davidrothenberg2, iTunes or www.thousandmilesong.com. The musical tract includes a never-before-recorded Pete Seeger song, "The World's Last Whale." The CD also won 2008 best cover design from All About Jazz NY Magazine.

Creature lovers may recall that Rothenberg authored the bestselling Why Birds Sing (Basic Books) in 2005. Booklist is a 100-year-old journal, published by the American Library Association, whose core mission is to provide public and school librarians with reviews that help them decide what to buy. In recent years, Booklist has also become a valuable tool that helps librarians make reading recommendations.

Rothenberg's previous recordings include On the Cliffs of the Heart (New Tone Records, 1995) featuring percussionist Glen Velez and banjo player Graeme Boone. The work, praised by composer John Cage, was named a top ten release of 1995 by Jazziz.

Why Birds Sing was published in the US, England, Australia, Italy, Germany, Spain, Korea, China, and Taiwan as both a book and compact disc. BBC Television aired a special about it last summer with appearances by Laurie Anderson, Jarvis Cocker, Beth Orton, and Damon Albarn. Other books by Rothenberg include Sudden Music: Improvisation, Art, Nature (University of Georgia Press, 2001), Blue Cliff Record: Zen Echoes (Codhill Press, New Paltz, NY, 2001), Hand's End: Technology and the Limits of Nature (University of California Press, Berkeley, 1993), Is It Painful to Think? Conversations with Arne Naess (University Press, University of Minnesota, 1992), and Always the Mountains (University of Georgia Press, 2002).

Rothenberg is the editor of the Terra Nova book series, published by MIT Press, presenting environmental issues as culture, not only policy. His own writing has been anthologized in The Best Spiritual Writing 1999 edited by Philip Zaleski (Harper, San Francisco) and The Soul of Nature: Visions of a Living Earth by M. Tobias. His articles have appeared in Parabola, Orion, The Nation, Wired, and other publications.

NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university, at the edge in knowledge, enrolls more than 8, 000 students in bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 92 degree programs offered by six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, New Jersey School of Architecture, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, Albert Dorman Honors College and College of Computing Sciences. NJIT is renowned for expertise in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. In 2006, Princeton Review named NJIT among the nation's top 25 campuses for technology and top 150 for best value. U.S. News & World Report's 2007 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities.



write your comments about the article :: 2008 Jazz News :: home page