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Signify's 3D-printed luminaires

Signify showcased new additions to its sustainable 3D-printed lighting collection at the world's leading international design fair, Salone del Mobile. The exhibition featured an exclusive collaboration with innovative textile designer Aleksandra Gaca, and Signify's award-winning Coastal Breeze collection, which is made with 100% recycled fishing nets. A special highlight is a new design with exceptional textures and exclusive finishes, from Aleksandra Gaca. Gaca's innovative woven textiles sit at the intersection of art, design and architecture and match perfectly with the 3D printing technology used to create Philips MyCreation lighting objects.

"As a textile designer, I am really excited about the 3D printing techniques developed by Signify, because they allow me to quickly and easily incorporate my textures into everyday objects within anyone's reach," said Aleksandra Gaca. "I also feel really connected to the company's commitment to sustainability. The Philips MyCreation Coastal Breeze project is a powerful demonstration that the union of design and innovation can give life to a more beautiful world and a more sustainable future."

Three dimensions of sustainability

Signify continues to push the boundaries of sustainable design with its 3D-printed luminaires that reduce emissions, reduce waste, and contribute to a circular economy. All the 3D-printed luminaires are made with at least 55% recycled or bio-circular materials. A reinvented manufacturing process cuts the number of components by up to 40% and eliminates the need for glue, making it much easier to disassemble and recycle parts for repair and refurbishment. Lighter materials create fewer carbon emissions, and since the products are printed on demand, no unsold stock goes to waste.



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