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Up to Date Aerial Imagery of London Now Available

Getmapping has released the most up to date and detailed aerial imagery of London and it is available for immediate download from Getmapping.com. Captured during September 2008 the new imagery covers the whole of central London stretching from Heathrow and the M25 in the West to the Thames Estuary in the East. The imagery was captured using the latest digital camera technology providing rich colour definition and ground detail.

Each image pixel is equivalent to 12.5 cm on the ground making it possible to see very fine detail right down to road markings and street furniture. This makes it ideal for use by Local Authorities, Utility companies and the Emergency Services as well as architects, engineers, planners, asset managers and map makers.

Aerial imagery is in daily use by the Emergency Services and Local Authorities where it is used to reveal the true nature of the built and natural environment in conjunction with traditional maps. Aerial imagery is a vital component of command and control for incident mobilisation, crime investigation and analysis. Local authorities increasingly use aerial photography to collect information to inform the planning process. Much of this work used to require specific site surveys which can now be carried out without leaving the office. Armed with up to date imagery it is possible to check anything from a Tree Preservation Order to an illegally built extension.

Image capture of London is fraught with problems not least the weather and air traffic control with the skies over Heathrow being amongst the busiest in the World. London is a rapidly changing city so it needs to be flown at regular intervals to ensure that the imagery keeps pace with what is actually going on in terms of new build and development for example the new Wembley Stadium and Heathrow Terminal 5. Getmapping will be completing acquisition of the remainder of the inner M25 area during the 2009 flying season.



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