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Comodo Code Signing Supports Mozilla Foundation Standards

Comodo code-signing certificates enable developers to sign Mozilla extensions or "Add-ons" for a wide variety of different operating systems such as Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Mozilla applications recognize XPIs as "trusted" when they are signed with a Comodo Code-Signing certificate.

XPI (pronounced "Zippy") is short for "Cross Platform Install." XPI enables Developers to create installer modules for their programs meant to enhance Mozilla applications such as Firefox, Thunderbird, Sea Monkey and Sunbird.

Comodo Code-Signing certificates verify and authenticate the entity that has created the XPI file, allowing end users to trust their execution. Most browsers will not accept action commands from downloaded code unless the code is signed by a trusted Certificate Authority.

An example of a trusted code-signing certificate, this one has been issued by Comodo.

"You still need to trust, but verify", said Melih Abdulhayoglu. "If you get a file called InstallMe.XPI, do you trust the person who sent it to you? What if it contains malware that might damage your computer? It is much easier to prevent your computer from allowing an untrusted file to install than it is to detect a problem and fix it after the fact."



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