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Macally Intros New Mice Products for Apple's Mac

Macally debuts four new mice products for Apple's Mac computer lines. The announcement comes on the first day of Macworld Conference & Expo at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Macally will show its new mice along with its full line of accessories and peripherals for Mac computer products, the iPod and iPhone at its booth, number 926, in the South Hall.

The new mice from Macally are:
- Accuglide: This mouse uses newly-developed Opto-mechanical technology, which combines laser sensor performance with optical sensor safeties and 800 dpi for industry-leading precision and smooth control. It connects to a computer via a USB port, while its low-profile design makes it easy to carry and use.
- Pebble Wireless: This five-button wireless mouse uses 2.4GHz RF to connect to a computer, eliminating the need for a wire on the desk. It can be used in a range of resolutions (400, 800 and 1600 dpi) to meet customer needs. The Pebble Wireless features a swivel cover to hide the IR receiver when not in use. The ergonomic design features make it comfortable and easy to use.
- Pebble: This five-button mouse features a programmable four-way scroll button with tilt-wheel technology to meet user's needs. Like the Pebble Wireless, it has a selectable laser resolution (400, 800 and 1600 dpi), which lets customers choose their level of precision and responsiveness. Its ergonomic design makes it comfortable to use. It connects to a computer via USB.
- Turtle: This USB mouse is ideal for use with a Mac notebook. It features a retractable USB cord that extends to the desired length, then neatly tucks inside a compartment, preventing the cord from tangling with other items inside a briefcase. Its 800 dpi precision laser sensor makes it accurate, while its ergonomic design and compact size make it easy and comfortable to use.

The above new mice products from Macally are available now. The above mice work with both Mac computers and PCs.



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