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CQout Becomes the 2nd Largest UK Auction Site

UK based internet auction site CQout this month celebrates having over half a million items for sale on www.CQout.com for the first time, cementing its claim to be the UK's second largest internet auction site.

CQout was set up by three London Business School graduates in late 1999, and since then the company has grown quietly by word of mouth, content to watch other auction sites come and go while developing its own solid reputation for security and customer service to the point where it now has users in over 50 countries.

From the start CQout has insisted on a rigorous validation policy to ensure users are genuine. This policy has proved contentious at times but it has ensured fraudsters and scammers are kept out protecting everyone using the site.

CQout provides a different type of auction service to the market leader. CQout charges every new user a one-off registration fee of ?2.00. The fee covers the administrative costs of validating user details to create and maintain a secure environment where buyers and sellers can trust that goods will be delivered, items paid for, and that time wasting bids will not be made.

The site also operates a 'three strikes and you're out' policy on negative feedback. Three justified negative feedback comments from purchasers will have a seller banned for life. Rigorous security prevents banned users from re-registering with different details.

CQout does not charge listing fees for standard listings (hence 'no sale, no fee'), and fees for all optional extras are all clearly visible. New users can also see how this compares to other sites by using afee comparison table.

By not spending huge sums on advertising CQout has channeled its resources into first class customer service. The team offers sellers of all sizes useful tools such as an Excel based up-loader that can import listings from a range of formats, automatic re-listing of unsold items as well as search statistics.



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