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IGEL Includes a Leostream Client in the Latest Version of Its Linux Firmware

IGEL Technology has announced the inclusion of a Leostream client in the latest version of its Linux firmware. The addition of virtualisation, one of the most important digital services to have emerged in recent years, offers unique and exciting advantages to thin client customers.

IGEL offers VDI compliance in addition to all the other digital services available in its Linux firmware. This includes terminal emulation, Citrix ICA, NoMachine NX, VoIP, Java and native SAP. By offering VDI compliance as an addition to its firmware and not as a unique, single-function product, organisations can pick and chose the right protocols to access their server-based infrastructures. This gives a better user experience, reduces the required server investment and allows devices to be consolidated, such as a virtual PC and a telephone.

IGEL will make the new Linux firmware available across its broad and advanced product range, giving customers many unique benefits. Older PCs can be converted to VDI capable thin clients with IGEL's PC conversion card. Dual monitor support is available in all popular form factors and all devices come with SmartCard support and powerful remote management software.

The benefits of Leostream Connection Broker, which must be bought separately from the IGEL Linux thin clients, include:
- Desktops can be remotely managed and assigned to users from a pool and be returned to the pool after use in order to efficiently use the available computing power.
- Single sign-on avoids the need to re-enter usernames and passwords.
- Integration with existing remote desktop viewer avoids the need for Java, ensuring a highly responsive user experience.
- Support for a wide range of remote desktop protocols enables the complexity of the backend system to be hidden from the user - they just login and are automatically connected to the appropriate resource using the necessary connectivity.
- Zero user retraining - hosted desktops look and behave like physical desktops.



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