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Joburg's Toughest Paraplegic Takes on Joburg's Toughest Race


by Cameo Corporate Communications Fraser Mc Henry

Tendai Innocent Khumalo from SAS Institute South Africa will be taking on the 94.7 Cycle Challenge this November in support of some of the Chris Hani Baragwanath's paraplegic patients as well as a number of hand picked less fortunate individuals.

Joburg's toughest paraplegic takes on Joburg's toughest race Tendai Innocent Khumalo from SAS Institute South Africa will be taking on the 94.7 Cycle Challenge this November in support of some of the Chris Hani Baragwanath's paraplegic patients as well as a number of hand picked less fortunate individuals.

Tendai, a paraplegic himself is the Gauteng Sales Manager at SAS, and will be putting his muscle behind his wheelchair and cycle for the benefit of paraplegics less fortunate than himself. His goal is to raise money for wheelchairs for those who cannot afford them, and to raise awareness for the cause of paraplegics in the country.

Tendai was an athletic sportsman who played basketball, rugby and cricket before the operation that changed his life forever. After experiencing constant pains in his shin for which no cause could be found, an MRI revealed a tumour in his spine. The biopsy was successful, yet the growth could not be removed during the operation and post op a blood clot developed which then caused spinal shock, stopping the flow of oxygen to Tendai's spine and leaving him paralysed from the waist down.

Despite his circumstances, Tendai remains positive and upbeat about life. When asked why he wants to take on Joburg's toughest race, he answers: "Because I can. And also because I want to give back to people less fortunate than myself, proving to them that not being able to walk does not mean your life is over." SAS, in support of Tendai's challenge, is calling on corporates and individuals to sponsor him by donating R500 for every kilometre he completes, or by donating any sum of money, thereby raising the funds to buy wheelchairs for those who cannot buy them for themselves.

A middle of the range wheel chair currently costs about R16 000, which to many families on South Africa is more than their annual income. SAS is partnering with the Mail & Guardian, and Tendai will be supported by a team of able bodied cyclists from both organisations, who will be cycling the race with him. Other sponsors involved include the SKF, as well as Unicas and African Merchant Bank, others have begun supporting him in their personal capacity.



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